Team for Research in
Ubiquitous Secure Technology

Improved Support for Machine-Assisted Ballot-Level Audits
David Wagner

Citation
David Wagner. "Improved Support for Machine-Assisted Ballot-Level Audits". Talk or presentation, 10, October, 2013.

Abstract
We perform an empirical study to better understand two well-known vulnerability rewards programs, or VRPs, which software vendors use to encourage community participation in finding and responsibly disclosing software vulnerabilities. The Chrome VRP has cost approximately $580,000 over 3 years and has resulted in 501 bounties paid for the identification of security vulnerabilities. The Firefox VRP has cost approximately $570,000 over the last 3 years and has yielded 190 bounties. 28% of Chrome’s patched vulnerabilities appearing in security advisories over this period, and 24% of Firefox’s, are the result of VRP contributions. Both programs appear economically efficient, comparing favorably to the cost of hiring full-time security researchers. The Chrome VRP features low expected payouts accompanied by high potential payouts, while the Firefox VRP features fixed payouts. Finding vulnerabilities for VRPs typically does not yield a salary comparable to a full-time job; the common case for recipients of rewards in either program is that they have received only one reward. Firefox has far more critical-severity vulnerabilities than Chrome, which we believe is attributable to an architectural difference between the two browsers.

Electronic downloads

Citation formats  
  • HTML
    David Wagner. <a
    href="http://www.truststc.org/pubs/928.html"
    ><i>Improved Support for Machine-Assisted
    Ballot-Level Audits</i></a>, Talk or
    presentation,  10, October, 2013.
  • Plain text
    David Wagner. "Improved Support for Machine-Assisted
    Ballot-Level Audits". Talk or presentation,  10,
    October, 2013.
  • BibTeX
    @presentation{Wagner13_ImprovedSupportForMachineAssistedBallotLevelAudits,
        author = {David Wagner},
        title = {Improved Support for Machine-Assisted Ballot-Level
                  Audits},
        day = {10},
        month = {October},
        year = {2013},
        abstract = {We perform an empirical study to better understand
                  two well-known vulnerability rewards programs, or
                  VRPs, which software vendors use to encourage
                  community participation in finding and responsibly
                  disclosing software vulnerabilities. The Chrome
                  VRP has cost approximately $580,000 over 3 years
                  and has resulted in 501 bounties paid for the
                  identification of security vulnerabilities. The
                  Firefox VRP has cost approximately $570,000 over
                  the last 3 years and has yielded 190 bounties. 28%
                  of Chromeâs patched vulnerabilities appearing in
                  security advisories over this period, and 24% of
                  Firefoxâs, are the result of VRP contributions.
                  Both programs appear economically efficient,
                  comparing favorably to the cost of hiring
                  full-time security researchers. The Chrome VRP
                  features low expected payouts accompanied by high
                  potential payouts, while the Firefox VRP features
                  fixed payouts. Finding vulnerabilities for VRPs
                  typically does not yield a salary comparable to a
                  full-time job; the common case for recipients of
                  rewards in either program is that they have
                  received only one reward. Firefox has far more
                  critical-severity vulnerabilities than Chrome,
                  which we believe is attributable to an
                  architectural difference between the two browsers.},
        URL = {http://www.truststc.org/pubs/928.html}
    }
    

Posted by Carolyn Winter on 18 Nov 2013.
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